Preventing Domestic Abuse – Important Information and Safety Tips

Domestic Abuse and Violence towards Woman & Children are at Unacceptable Levels.

Here are some current statistics found on the internet –

1) One woman is assaulted every two minutes

2) 4 out of 10 assaults take place in the victims home

3) Nearly 2 in 3 female victims of violence are related to or knew their attacker.

4) Anywhere from 1-3 million women have been battered each year by their intimate partner.

5) According to the U.S. Surgeon General, domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women in the United States.

6) It is estimates that more than a million women each year have been stalked by an intimate partner in the United States.

7) Each day 4 women die as a result of abuse.

8) Each day 3 children die as a result of abuse.

9) In 2005, teenage women (ages 12-19) experience 1.5 million violent crimes; this figure includes 75,354 sexual assault and rapes

Domestic violence occurs to all types of women regardless of income, age, race, education, or belief system. Domestic violence is a major contributing factor to other problems including child abuse, neglect, drug & alcohol abuse, emotional problems, job-loss, homelessness, and attempted suicide. Nearly one-third of American women report being physically or sexually abused by a husband or boyfriend at some point in their lives.

Family violence costs the nation $ 24 billion annually in medical expenses, police and court costs, shelters and foster care, sick leave, absenteeism, and non-productivity. Indirect cost raise this to $84 billion. These statistics are grim reminders that domestic abuse and violence towards women and children is a real and dangerous problem for millions. We need to make every effort we can towards stopping the increasing violence and reversing the statistics.

The good news is there are people and agencies in almost every community that are helping women. People are helping each other battle this problem, one step at a time. There are many important steps we can take to help. Let’s list some of these:

1) If you or someone you know is a victim of domestic abuse, it’s important to act immediately. Get away from the abuse as soon as possible. Report the Abuse to your local agency or a woman’s support organization. Help is available.

2) Be aware of warning signs to prevent you or someone you know from becoming a victim. The seeds of violence are often planted long before physical abuse takes place. Remove yourself from a potential violent situation or seek help in doing so.

3) Learn Important Home & Personal Safety Tips to help keep you and your family safe.

4) Donate time, supplies, money and other resources to local organizations and shelters. They need your help.

5) Support Public Awareness and Education – Public awareness is essential in keeping these issues on national, state and local agendas. Violence prevention begins in our schools and our public agencies. Education is the key to opening the door to a healthy and productive dialogue about domestic violence.

Campus Safety Tips For Incoming Freshman

The school year is fast approaching and with the start of school brings a large number of incoming freshmen to the countries Colleges and Universities. To most families this is a joyous occasion, but can also be an intimidating endeavor to some. Each year and at every facility of higher learning campus crimes such as rape, robbery, and assault are in the news. Not only does a student have the responsibility of taking their education to a higher level, it is also their responsibility to prepare for their safety while away at school.

With this in mind here are some tips and ideas that should help everyone to feel safe and secure.

o Incoming freshmen should “decline” any invitations to have photographs or personal information published for distribution to the campus community. Fraternities and upperclassmen have abused this type of publication and like to “target” naive freshmen. Female students need to be extra cautious of any requests for pictures and personal information.

o Do some recon of your neighborhood and the campus in regards to your routes from to and from each of your classes. Find out where the emergency phones and campus police stations are.

o Make sure that you let your parents and some friends know your class and activities schedule, give emergency contact information to your institution. Give all of your contact information such as cell number, home number, roommate’s cell number, and address to your parents, guardians, and close friends.

o Always travel with a group, if possible create a “buddy system” that can be used for travel to and from classes. Use a shuttle service after dark. Never walk alone at night. Avoid “shortcuts” as a few extra minutes travel time is well worth your personal safety.

o Study the campus, academic buildings, residence halls, and other facilities while regular classes are being held, and after dark to see what buildings, walkways, quad areas, and parking lots are adequately secure, have appropriate lighting and are patrolled. Are emergency phones readily available, campus escort services supplied, and are the shuttle services secure and timely?

o To get an idea of the social climate of the university, drive down fraternity row on a weekend night or take a walk through the student hangouts. Do you see people behaving in a responsible manner, or does the mood seem reckless and dangerous? Are the people drinking and using drugs, is there a law enforcement presence? Remember that alcohol and/or drug abuse is involved in up to 90 percent of campus crime. Take time to carefully evaluate off-campus student housing, apartment complexes, and fraternity houses if you plan to live off campus.

Additional Campus Safety Tips:

o Don’t carry a purse or back pack on each shoulder.

o Don’t carry large amounts of cash.

o Don’t flaunt expensive jewelry.

o Lock valuables in the trunk. Don’t leave CD’s, tapes, textbooks, backpacks visible on car seats.

o Never leave your book bag, purse, or cell phone unattended in the library, classrooms or on the rest room floor. Keep these items with you – it only takes a second for someone to take one of these items when unattended.

o While driving, if you notice that you are being followed, do not go home. Drive to the nearest police station, open store, or service station for help. If you are fearful of exiting your vehicle, blow your horn to draw attention to yourself. If at anytime you feel like you are in danger, notify authorities immediately.

Fight Back – Don’t Be A Victim!